Lámina Proyecto Cartografía Actos y Signos Primera Travesía

A gorgeous infographic of the 1965 Travesía Amereida!

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Footnote: The Adventures of Jean Mermoz

I’m going through a pretty mellow moment in my life: tucked away in a small town 120 miles south of Santiago I’ve got loads of time to just sit and write. Despite living in a cave, some of the outside world does trickle in and lately it’s been a name: Jean Mermoz.  Continue reading

Alaska to Cape Horn

1991, Amereida, Travesías 1984 a 1988

Escuela de Arquitectura Universidad Católica de Valparaíso, Amereida Travesías 1984 a 1988. Viña del Mar: Taller de Investigaciones Gráficas, Escuela de Arquitectura UCV, 1991.

Caption translations, left to right:
>Santa Cruz is situated between/ the abandoned: the first foundation/ and the non-foundable/ the Alaska—Cape Horn dimension
>San José—Santa Cruz/ precision distance/ to establish in the interior
>the possible totality/ of America/ the the road from Alaska to Cape Horn/ a secant that crosses the continent

I’ve spent the better part of today staring at these drawings. I’m pretty used to South America inverted at this point. But after blinking and shifting my gaze I noticed North America. Now I can truly appreciate this drawing and how odd it is to see the U.S. lumped together with Canada and how elegantly the School of Valparaíso proposes to travel from Alaska to Cape Horn. So many cyclists, VW van owners, and every pedestrian in between have answered the call of the Pan-American Highway. Only this line is not that route, but a poetic turn that will take you through parts of Bolivia and Argentina with no north-south axis. Admire the map, just don’t follow it.

Footnote: The Travesía Workout Plan

1991, Amereida, Travesías 1984 a 1988, 165

Travesía Exercise Series. Escuela de Arquitectura Universidad Católica de Valparaíso, Amereida Travesías 1984 a 1988. Viña del Mar: Taller de Investigaciones Gráficas, Escuela de Arquitectura UCV, 1991.

Faculty and students at the School of Valparaíso really think of everything when it comes to the travesías. Considering that for trip each dozens of participants travel for at least two weeks and, until recently, by bus into the wilds of South America they had to plan the journey with considerable attention to detail. One of the most amusing anecdotes I’ve heard is of a professor requesting models from his Object Design students: they created a model of the bus they’d be traveling on as well as models of their backpacks to make sure everything could fit. It did. Among all the calculations, I really appreciate this series of exercises. The visuals are so clear and effective, preparing these young students for the toils of construction. Continue reading