Research Free Chile

The latest issue of La Panera, one of my favorite Chilean art magazines, features Nemesio Antúnez, one of my favorite Chilean art historical figures. But this post isn’t about art history but rather an unsexy, unsung, yet critical element within this discipline: research. I love research. As an art historian in the twenty-first century, I have an unparalleled amount of sources. Of course, there’s always old faithful: the library. Full of dusty pages, broken spines, crowded reading rooms, and misplaced books. But for this dissertation I’m keeping it mostly digital.  Continue reading

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Ladies with Lots of Last Names

ca. 1860-1873, Santiago

ca. 1860-1873

In Love in the Time of Cholera Gabriel García Márquez’s heroine faces discrimination due to her less than stellar origins: though Fermina Daza’s father is a mule driver, he dreams of catapulting her into the elite through marriage. Fermina’s father succeeded, much to the surprise of the other young ladies vying to be Juvenal Urbino’s bride. Especially since many of these ladies were actually ladies, and part of Juvenal’s social orbit by virtue of their multiple last names. García Márquez communicated this subtle critique of class politics through a lovely visual, like a string of pearls (how suitable), and I was reminded of it today when I read the third installment of “La Mujer Chilena en la Memoria,” a series from the Society section of El Mercurio. Continue reading